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PTFE release film

Discussion in 'Vacuum Bagging' started by James, Nov 19, 2013.

  1. James

    James New Member

    Hi folks, has anyone ever used PTFE coated Glass fabric for a release film for vac bagging, ive heard its superior to other release films.
  2. Racerx67

    Racerx67 New Member Staff Member

    Post up a link to the product as it sounds interesting... Never used it but then I have not had too many problems with the usual release films.
  3. James

    James New Member

    Hi this is info i have.

    FF03PM
    Release fabric
    Ideally suited to flat or single curvature applications

    Features
    • Medium porosity PTFE coated glass fabric.
    • Ideal for use on flat or single curvature mouldings.
    • PTFE release coating ensures very easy release from
    the laminate without fear of contamination.
    • High performance material designed for use in extreme
    temperature and pressure processing conditions.
    Properties
    Maximum cure temperature 320°C 608°F
    Colour Light brown
    Fabric type Glass
    Fabric weight 70g/m² 2.06oz/yd²
    Release coating PTFE
  4. Racerx67

    Racerx67 New Member Staff Member

    Ah OK.. So it is a non porous release fabric which seems is used to avoid imprinting any texture onto the back face of the part. It also takes higher temperatures too. Due to the lack of flexibility of the material it would be limited to simple flat or basic curved parts as is shows in the description. I would think for most the cost of it would be a little prohibitive as it would only be of use for specific parts. I like the idea of no imprinting but its use for me personally would be limited. I have tried a combined release film and breather material which looks good in principle and works well with basic shapes again. But of the 5 sq m I got to try 7 months ago I still have 4 sq m left as it will not work for most of my parts.

    I think for most of us using wet lay or out of autoclaved pre-pregs, FF03PM is a little limited and cost prohibitive as we dont need extreme high temperatures and have no real way of applying high pressures without an autoclave and press mould tooling will not need that material. It is nice to think we can remove some of the imprinting release films leave behind but as most of the parts many of us make you will only see the back face once when you sell it to a customer is when they take it out of the box to fit it.

    What were you thinking of using it for, if you needed something like this? I think an example of a use for you may open up a few more ideas or suggestions too..
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2013
  5. Racerx67

    Racerx67 New Member Staff Member

    I have been looking to find out more and it seems it is quite like an adhesive PTFE Glass I have used once. I used it to help reduce the ridge in a poorly made 2 piece mould and I used it to bridge (or attempt to bridge) the gap. It released perfectly and did give a nice surface finish. But I did use it to reduce a problem in a mould and probably not what it was designed to be used for but it did get me out of a hole so to speak.
  6. James

    James New Member

    Thanks mate, just heard about dont know where as an alternative but i guess price may be an issue, im just making small RC parts.
  7. Racerx67

    Racerx67 New Member Staff Member

    The adhesive one I used was too stiff for anything to shaped so it is more down to how it will work with the shape you have to mould. Wings ect may be fine. But a normal release film is cheaper and does the same job if you cannot see that surface. It does give a lovely finish it is just looking at if you need to show off that finish.
  8. Gary

    Gary Administrator Staff Member

    Hi James, just read this post im sure we have something in the workshop similar that we use on a particular application, ill take a look.
  9. chris

    chris New Member

    We used to use the PTFE glass when repairing aircraft skin repairs, to give a good finish when the repair was blind. We used a Hot Bond Controller to apply a vacuum and heat via a pad or external IR lights. These would be usually simple forms with a single curve. The results were good and the RAF paid for the materials, but on a complicated form or detailed work absolutely no good, too stiff.
  10. Gary

    Gary Administrator Staff Member

    Aha got some for sale shortly:D

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